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Glitter of youth through philosophy and mathematics in 1970s 2015

Glitter of youth through philosophy and mathematics in 1970s

TANAKA Akio

In 1970s at Tokyo or in my age 20s there surely exists glitter of youth in my life, now I remember.
In those days, in Japan many fabulous magazines were successively published. Episteme,Toshi(City)、Chugoku(China) and the likes. Especially I loved reading Episteme which had printed many philosophical or philological articles as the form of special issues concentrated important philosopher, thinker and writer. The chief editor of Episteme was NAKANO Mikitaka(1943-2007), probably one of the best editors in the latter half of the 20th century in Japan.  The most impressive number was Ludwig Wittgenstein(1889-1951), probably in 1977. Also influenced from the issue of Kurt Gödel(1906-1978)who gave me the possibility of set theory.

In my life, Wittgenstein gave the big influence for thinking and writing style, never entering or approaching his essential philosophical themes.Aftermillennium year when I started the regular writing on language universals, my writing style was resembling in his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. My paper written in 2003, Quantum Theory for Language shows a very imitative style to him. This tendency kept on for some time till I changed to adopt algebraic method for more clear description to the themes.

1970s was a relatively calm times after those university’s revolution in the late 1960s in which I also compellingly rolled in. In those days I almost had been wandering between library and old book shops aiming my life-time true themes cowardly avoiding the turmoils of university and towns. Blaise Pascal(1623-1662)’s Pansees was my favourite one. One day at Kanda’s Taiwan chinese book shop Kaifu Shoten, I bought WANG Guowei(1877-1927)’s Guantangjilin that opened the new frontier for classical Chinese philology mainly streamed by “Small Study”, traditional exegetics in China. Influenced WANG Guowei I wrote a paper titled On Time Property Inherent in Characters, 2003 by which I began the latter start of language study.

In 1970s, I had cherished a dream in which I wanted to use mathematical description and get the essential of language. But I had not any ability to proceed the study for it while I read at random several mathematical books. One day I found and bought the amount Nicolas Bourbaki(1935-)’s text books at old book shop in Kanda, Tokyo. They were hard to keep reading for my talent in those days. After all, the books were put aside the desk. The remaining in my mind was adoration to Bourbaki and their brilliant achievement. My return to Bourbaki was long after in 1990s when I again tried the pursuit of language having a clear vision to study language universals according to the Linguistic Circle of Prague, especially aiming to resolve the supposition presented by Sergej Karcevskij(1884-1955).

Turning round the past days, my way was always narrow and winding road. But it keeps till now not breaking off in any situations. The way was finely glittering in my youth days despite under the cloudy sky. Probably I have kept happily walking till now being assisted by many people especially at the field of language, mathematics and relevant studies.

At random now I remember the dear names from whom I  never cannot hear their voices. HASEGAWA Hiroshi, CHEN Donghai Chinese languageKAJIMURA Hideki, CHO Shokichi Korean languageNatary Muravijowa Russian languageONO Shinobu Chinese literatureMIIYAZAKI Kenzo, FURUTA Hiromu, KONDO Tadayoshi Japanese literatureANDO Tsuguo French poemSAEKI Shoichi HaikuIKEDA Hiroshi Japanese classical dramaSAITO Kohei sculptureYAMAGISHI Tokuhei bibliographyNISHI Junzo Chinese philosophyKAWASAKI Tsuneyuki BuddhismCHINO Eiichi Russian language, the Linguistic Circle of Prague. At last dear friend of high school days KANEKO Yutakmathematics and our youth.

Tokyo
6 March 2015
Sekinan Library

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